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SIGGRAPH 2014, AUGUST 10-14, VANCOUVER, CANNADA

OFFICIAL NVIDIA ACTIVITIES & Presenters AT SIGGRAPH 2014

COURSES

Learn from the experts in the field and gain inside knowledge that can be critical to your research and career. Courses are structured sessions that often include elements of interactive demonstration, performance, or other imaginative approaches to teaching.

 

Tuesday, August 12 | West Building, Rooms 109/110

14:00 - 17:15

Recent Advances in Light-Transport Simulation: Some Theory and a Lot of Practice

 

We are witnessing a renewed research interest in robust and efficient light-transport simulation based on statistical methods. This research effort is propelled by the desire to accurately render general environments with complex materials and light sources, which is often difficult with the industry-standard ad hoc solutions. In addition, it has been recognized that advanced methods, which can render many effects in one pass without excessive tweaking, increase artists' productivity and allow them to focus on their creative work. For this reason, the movie industry is shifting away from approximate rendering solutions towards physically based rendering methods, which poses new challenges in terms of strict requirements on high image quality and algorithm robustness.


Many of the recent advances in light-transport simulation, such as new Markov-chain Monte Carlo methods, the robust combination of bidirectional path tracing with photon mapping, or path-space filtering are made possible by interpreting light transport as an integral in the space of light paths. However, there is a great deal of confusion among practitioners and researchers alike regarding these path-space methods.


The main contribution of the theoretical part of the course is a coherent review of the path-integral formulation of light transport and its applications, including the most recent ones. The course demonstrates that rendering algorithms that may seem complex at first sight are in fact naturally derived from this general framework. It also shows that the path-integral framework makes the extension of the surface-based algorithm to volumetric media extremely simple. The course includes an extensive empirical comparison of the various light-transport algorithms. A substantial part of the course is then devoted to application of advanced light-transport simulation and path-sampling methods in practical rendering tasks in architectural visualization and VFX.

 

Alexander Keller (NVIDIA)

Alexander Keller
Intended Audience: Industry professionals and researchers interested in recent advances in robust light-transport simulation for realistic rendering with global illumination.
 

Wednesday, August 13 | East Building, Ballroom A

10:45 - 12:15

Why Graphics Programmers Need to Know About DRAM

 

For applications like graphics, where data are often not cache-resident, optimizing for DRAM access is critical for improving both speed and power performance. The dramatic difference in speed and power of a DRAM access vs. an on-chip memory access means that even small changes in main-memory traffic and behavior can have a large impact on system performance. For example, many studies attribute 25-40% of total power consumed in a data center to the DRAM system. In the graphics domain, a proposed architecture for ray tracing with cache-hit-rate percentages in the 90s still shows almost 60% of the power consumed in the DRAM.


Optimizing for DRAM requires knowing something about the complex and subtle behavior of DRAM memory: understanding chip organization and functionality, organization of chips and data on a DIMM, and the behavior of the memory controller. This course presents examples of how much difference DRAM optimization can make in graphics programs, then describes the operation and behavior of DRAM memory that application programmers can take advantage of. It concludes with a description of a detailed DRAM simulator (USIMM) that can be used to add high-fidelity DRAM models to system simulations.

 

Niladrish Chatterjee (NVIDIA)

Niladrish Chatterjee
Intended Audience: Programmers who are interested in optimizing the overall performance of their applications, including memory behavior.
 

EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES

Play with the latest interactive and graphics technologies before they transform the way we live and work. Emerging Technologies presents demonstrations of research from several fields, including displays, input devices, collaborative environments, and robotics.

HOURS

  • Sunday, 10 August: 12:00 - 17:30
  • Monday, 11 August: 9:00 - 17:30
  • Tuesday, 12 August: 9:00 - 17:30
  • Wednesday, 13 August: 9:00 - 17:30
  • Thursday, 14 August: 9:00 - 13:00
 
 

August 10-14 | West Building, Exhibit Hall A

Cascaded Displays: Spatio-Temporal Super-Resolution Using Offset Pixel Layers

 

This project demonstrates that layered spatial-light modulators (SLMs), subject to fixed lateral displacements and refreshed at staggered intervals, can synthesize images with greater spatio-temporal resolution than that afforded by any single SLM used in their construction. Dubbed cascaded displays, such architectures enable super-resolution flat-panel displays composed of, for example, thin stacks of liquid crystal displays (LCDs). They also enable super-resolution digital projectors by, for example, relaying the image of one SLM onto another.


The demonstration introduces a comprehensive optimization framework, leveraging non-negative matrix and tensor factorization, that decomposes target images and videos into multi-layered, time-multiplexed attenuation patterns, which offer a flexible trade-off among apparent image brightness, spatial resolution, and refresh rate. Through this analysis, a real-time dual-layer factorization method that quadruples spatial resolution and doubles refresh rate was developed.


Compared to prior super-resolution displays, cascaded displays impose fewer restrictions on the hardware, offering thin designs without moving parts or the necessity of temporal multiplexing. Furthermore, cascaded displays are the first use of multi-layer displays to increase apparent temporal resolution. The concepts are validated using a custom-built head-mounted display (HMD) employing dual-layer cascaded LCDs.

 
Douglas Lanman (Oculus)
Douglas Lanman
Felix Heide (NVIDIA)
Dikpal Reddy (NVIDIA)
Dikpal Reddy
Jan Kautz (NVIDIA)
Jan Kautz
Kari Pulli (NVIDIA)
Kari Pulli
David Luebke (NVIDIA)
David Luebke

Pinlight Displays: Wide-Field-of-View Augmented-Reality Eyeglasses Using Defocused Point-Light Sources

 

This novel design for an optical see-through augmented-reality display offers a wide field of view and supports a compact form factor approaching ordinary eyeglasses. Instead of conventional optics, the design uses only two simple hardware components: an LCD panel and an array of point-light sources (implemented as an edge-lit, etched acrylic sheet) placed directly in front of the eye, out of focus. The point-light sources are coded through the LCD to form miniature see-through projectors. A virtual aperture encoded on the LCD allows the projectors to be tiled, creating an arbitrarily wide field of view. Software rearranges the target augmented image into tiled sub-images and sends them to the display, where they appear as the correct image when observed out of the viewer's accommodation range. Evaluation of the design space of tiled point-light emphasized on increasing spatial resolution through the use of eye tracking and demonstrated a preliminary human-viewable display.

 

Andrew Maimone (University of North Carolina/NVIDIA)
Douglas Lanman (Oculus)
Douglas Lanman
David Luebke (NVIDIA)
David Luebke
 

TALKS

Talks are a less formal alternative to formal publication. They often highlight the latest developments before publication, present ideas that are still in progress, or showcase how computer graphics and interactive techniques are actually implemented and used in production.

 
 

Thursday, August 14 | West Building, Rooms 109/110

10:45 - 12:15

Path Space Similarity Determined by Fourier Histogram Descriptors

 

A novel method for detecting light-path similarity using local image statistics and original radiance-distribution descriptors. Fourier Path Space Similarity can be integrated into numerous radiance filtering and caching techniques used in production rendering.

 
Pascal Gautron (NVIDIA)
Pascal Gautron
Marc Droske (NVIDIA)
Carsten Waechter (NVIDIA)
Carsten Waechter
Lutz Kettner (NVIDIA)
Carsten Waechter
Alexander Keller (NVIDIA)
Alexander Keller
Nikolaus Binder (NVIDIA)
Nikolaus Binder
Ken Dahm (NVIDIA)
Ken Dahm
 

Tuesday, August 12 | East Building, Exhibit Hall A

9:00 - 10:30

Path-Space Filtering

 

Smoothing the contribution of light-transport paths before reconstructing the image can efficiently reduce the noise inherent in sampling.

 
Alexander Keller (NVIDIA)
Alexander Keller
Ken Dahm (NVIDIA)
Ken Dahm
Nikolaus Binder (NVIDIA)
Nikolaus Binder
 

TECHNICAL PAPERS

The SIGGRAPH Technical Papers program is the premier international forum for disseminating new scholarly work in computer graphics and interactive techniques.

 
 

Tuesday, August 12 | East Building, Ballroom B/C

10:45 - 12:15

Cascaded Displays: Spatiotemporal Super-Resolution Using Offset Pixel Layers

 

Introducing cascaded displays: layered spatial-light modulators, subject to lateral displacements and refreshed at staggered intervals, synthesizing images with greater spatiotemporal resolution than any SLM in their construction. Practical benefits are demonstrated with a dual-layer LCD, showcasing head-mounted display applications, and a dual-modulation LCoS projector.

 
Felix Heide (NVIDIA)
Douglas Lanman (Oculus)
Douglas Lanman
Dikpal Reddy (NVIDIA)
Dikpal Reddy
Jan Kautz (NVIDIA)
 Jan Kautz
Kari Pulli (NVIDIA)
 Kari Pulli
David Luebke (NVIDIA)
David Luebke
15:45 - 17:15

Pinlight Displays: Wide Field of View Augmented-Reality Eyeglasses Using Defocused Point Light Sources

 

A design for an optical see-through near-eye display that provides a wide field of view (110 degrees) and a compact form factor approaching eyeglasses. The approach uses tiled defocused point light sources coded through a transmissive spatial light modulator to project into the eye.

 
Andrew Maimone (University of North Carolina/NVIDIA)
Douglas Lanman (Oculus)
Douglas Lanman
David Luebke (NVIDIA)
David Luebke
 

Tuesday, 12 August | Vancouver Convention Centre, East Building, Ballroom B/C

9:00 - 10:30

Online Motion Synthesis Using Sequential Monte Carlo

 

A novel system for synthesizing interactive and physically valid character motion based on sequential Monte Carlo sampling. The 36-degree-of-freedom 3D human character can balance, dodge projectiles, and improvise a get up strategy if forced to lose balance. No training data or state machine is needed.

 
Jaakko Lehtinen (NVIDIA)
Jaakko Lehtinen
 

Thursday, August 14 | West Building, Rooms 109/110

10:45 - 12:15

Unified Particle Physics for Real-Time Applications

 

This particle-based simulation framework is based on an efficient parallel constraint solver that allows gases, liquids, deformable solids, rigid bodies, and clothing to interact with each other in real time.

 
Miles Macklin (NVIDIA)
Miles Macklin
Matthias Müller (NVIDIA)
Matthias Müller
Nuttapong Chentanez (NVIDIA)
Nuttapong Chentanez
Tae-Yong Kim (NVIDIA)
Tae-Yong Kim
 
 
 

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